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Archive for August, 2006

What if you could sell tickets for every game your team plays during the season both home and away?

This would be a huge increase in the amount of revenue that I franchise could make and it could bring the “cheap” tickets back to sports allowing families to attend the games without spending a fortune. I’m willing to bet that in the next 20 years this will happen. Here’s how I see it working. Each home team has a scanning system that takes a 3-dimensional picture of the court/playing field at 60x per second. This information is then relayed to the away teams stadium through satellite where it is converted to a 3-d image on that teams court/playing field. The fans see the game happening in front of them just as if they were sitting in the stadium where the game was actually taking place. The easiest sport to do this with would be basketball. The dimensions of each teams court are exactly the same and the overhead rafters would be an ideal location to place the scanning and projection equipment. It would also work well for hockey and football but there are changes in the structure of the stadium (not always an overhead roof in football, different sized rinks in hockey) that would complicate the setup of this technology. Forget about doing this with baseball early on.

Now you’ve opened a huge new revenue stream. The experience won’t be exactly the same so the tickets would need to be cheaper. I’m sure seeing a holographic ball going through a real hoop may be little strange to see at first but overall I think this would be a great way to see a game.

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What if you could sell tickets for every game your team plays during the season both home and away?

This would be a huge increase in the amount of revenue that I franchise could make and it could bring the “cheap” tickets back to sports allowing families to attend the games without spending a fortune. I’m willing to bet that in the next 20 years this will happen. Here’s how I see it working. Each home team has a scanning system that takes a 3-dimensional picture of the court/playing field at 60x per second. This information is then relayed to the away teams stadium through satellite where it is converted to a 3-d image on that teams court/playing field. The fans see the game happening in front of them just as if they were sitting in the stadium where the game was actually taking place. The easiest sport to do this with would be basketball. The dimensions of each teams court are exactly the same and the overhead rafters would be an ideal location to place the scanning and projection equipment. It would also work well for hockey and football but there are changes in the structure of the stadium (not always an overhead roof in football, different sized rinks in hockey) that would complicate the setup of this technology. Forget about doing this with baseball early on.

Now you’ve opened a huge new revenue stream. The experience won’t be exactly the same so the tickets would need to be cheaper. I’m sure seeing a holographic ball going through a real hoop may be little strange to see at first but overall I think this would be a great way to see a game.

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Dinner and Movie

What if theaters were rebuilt so that they contained 2 or 3 restaurants in the same complex? People always leave their homes to go out dinner. If you can get people to these restaurants and potentially include tickets with the cost of dinner you would have a large amount of traffic coming through your theater complex. Now, what if you took this a step further? Let’s get rid of the cheesy movie theater ambience and make the theater a little classier. Then use waitresses and waiters to assist you in making it to your movie on time. They should make sure your meal comes out with enough time to get to the movie and perhaps even bring over your popcorn and coke so you can walk straight into the theater. First class service that people would be willing to pay for.

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Free Tickets?

One thought, which admittedly isn’t the best answer but it could help in some instances, is to give 1 free ticket to each person who purchases 2 tickets. The ticket would be to see a free movie at a later date. The theory behind this is that most people do not go to see a movie alone. The person with the free ticket wouldn’t want it to go to waste and would therefore invite other people to go.

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